Wednesday, 3 June 2020

8:00 AM — 2:30 PM

Registration

Location: Ballroom Foyer

8:00 — 8:45 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: Ballroom Foyer

8:45 — 8:50 AM

Welcome Remarks

Location: Ballroom

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

8:50 — 9:45 AM

View From the Top:
A Conversation With Industry Leaders

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Barbara Bryer

Senior Supply Chain Manager, Logistics,
adidas

Panelist

Vito Cerone

Managing Director,
Sales and Commercial Strategy, Air Canada Cargo

Panelist

Doron Grosman

President and CEO,
GCT Global Container Terminals

Panelist

Jean-Baptiste Longin

General Manager,
CMA CGM Canada

If you’re looking for platitudes and buzzwords from Canada’s top shipping leaders, look elsewhere. Speakers on this year’s View from the Top panel are outspoken executives who aren’t afraid to shake things up in order to push the industry forward. Consistently one of the most popular features of the Canada Trade Conference, this session will be a no-nonsense discussion about what the Canadian shipping industry is getting right, where the industry needs to catch up, and most importantly, how it can make up lost ground on issues ranging from the implementation of technology to freight infrastructure. Presenting a wide view, from expedited air cargo to retail importing, the speakers will do more than just share their perspective; they will also challenge the industry to be bolder and faster.

9:45 — 10:30 AM

West Coast Port Update:
The Race to Add Capacity

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Dean Davison

Technical Director,
Maritime,
WSP

Panelist

Brian Friesen

Vice President,

Trade Development and Communications,
Prince Rupert Port Authority

Capacity is coming to the West Coast, whether it’s the ongoing expansion of Centerm and recently expanded rail project at Deltaport, both in Vancouver, or the Port of Prince Rupert’s first phase of a two part expansion that will ultimately boost its capacity to 1.8 million TEU by mid-2022. But while those capacity injections promise greater cargo flow down the line, cargo owners and forwarders need to know today how marine terminals and ports are improving rail and truck flow, providing visibility that can be plugged into transportation management systems, and dealing with an increasing number of blank sailings by carriers. The fast-paced format — where port representatives will have limited time to address each major issue pertinent to cargo owners, and a noted port analyst weighing in — will give attendees a valuable update on western Canada port gateways and supporting networks.

10:30 — 11:00 AM

Networking Break

Location: Ballroom Foyer

11:00 — 11:45 AM

East Coast Port Update:
The Path to Growth and Efficiency

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Dean Davison

Technical Director,
Maritime,
WSP

Change is coming to ports in eastern Canada. For Montreal, the focus is on expanding capacity by beginning construction on the Contrecoeur terminal and building on improvements to cargo flow made after a surge in volumes challenged the country’s second-largest port in 2018. Halifax doesn’t need the capacity additions like its fellow eastern ports, but it’s still hungry for cargo. PSA International’s acquisition of Halifax’s largest container terminal and its collaboration with Canadian National Railway put it in a good position to grow. Halifax’s deep harbor and northern geography also leave it well-positioned to attract volumes from Southeast Asia moving through the Suez Canal, as production shifts out of China. Like the preceding panel, port representatives will deliver what cargo owners and forwarders need to know in a fast-paced format.

11:45 AM — 12:30 PM

Emerging Gateways:
Making the Grade

Location: Ballroom

Panelist

Don Krusel

Managing Director,
Port of Quebec

Panelist

Curtis Doiron

General Manager,
DP World Saint John

While they can route imports and exports through US ports, Canadian shippers and forwarders only have four major gateways in Canada. That could be changing, with the Port of Quebec vying for container services and Canadian Pacific Railway gaining direct access to Port Saint John, New Brunswick. Backed by Hutchison Ports and Canadian National Railway, the Quebec Port Authority plans to build a C$775 million (US$590 million) container terminal that could handle vessels up to 13,000 TEU. For Port Saint John, CP’s acquisition of Central Maine & Quebec Railway means the railroad now can serve Canadian and US markets via a deep-sea port on the East Coast. That primes the Nova Scotia port to build on its two weekly container services, and possibly attract a direct Asia service call.

12:30 — 1:30 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Ontario and Niagra

1:30 — 2:15 PM

Forwarder Focus:
Top Challenges and Regulations

Location: Ballroom

From blank sailings to customs inspections, Canadian forwarders inject value into the supply chain by responding quickly to disruption and delays on the water, land, or in the air. Customer demands for speed and reliability increase each year, as does the competition to make better use of data, both for decision-making and to fit seamlessly into customers’ transportation management systems. At the same time, forwarders are working with and encouraging the Canada Border Services Agency to streamline customs processes and better explain the reasoning behind container inspections. This discussion will focus on how small, medium-sized, and large forwarders are addressing new competitive pressures and innovating via technology and know-how.

Panelist

Julia Kuzeljevich

Public Affairs Manager,
CIFFA

Panelist

John Doble

Director,
Keen & Able Logistics (VCR)

2:15 — 2:45 PM

Port Policy: Modernizing Canadian Trade Gateways

Location: Ballroom

Panelist

Debbie Murray

Director,
Policy and Regulatory Affairs, Association of
Canadian Port Authorities

Rising trade, shifting trade flows, larger vessels, and cybersecurity threats are requiring Canadian ports to take new approaches, while balancing environmental and indigenous concerns. At the same time, new technologies, from port performance data portals to blockchain, offer ways to mitigate pressures and inject greater certainty into port flows without massive physical infrastructure investments. To help guide Canadian ports through these rocky waters, Transport Canada is reviewing the port authority system, with findings expected to be released by the summer. In this one-on-one discussion, Debbie Murray, director of policy and regulatory affairs at the Association of Canadian Port Authorities, will share how policy is shaping how ports respond to new pressures and opportunities.

2:45 — 3:30 PM

Decarbonizing the Supply Chain

Location: Ballroom

Panelist

Robert Lewis-Manning

President,
Chamber of Shipping

Panelist

Debbie Murray

Director,
Policy and Regulatory Affairs, Association of
Canadian Port Authorities

The decarbonization challenge facing the container shipping industry is massive. The initial International Maritime Organization strategy, unveiled in 2018, calls for a minimum 50 percent reduction from 2008 levels in global greenhouse gas emissions from the container shipping industry by 2050. Equally important, the IMO requires finalized short-term measures by 2023 and midterm measures to achieve a carbon dioxide emissions decline of 40 percent by 2030, while encouraging efforts to phase out GHG emissions completely. At the same time, marine terminals and ports are under pressure to reduce their cargo footprints, and major cargo owners increasingly are pushing their transportation providers to cut emissions, though they’re not yet ready to pay extra for it. This panel discussion will give attendees a clear understanding of the climate change-driven regulatory rules coming in Canada and globally, and how investment and technology can mitigate the cost while benefiting the environment.

3:30 PM

Closing Remarks

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.