Tuesday, 2 June 2020

7:30 AM — 6:00 PM

Registration

Location: Ballroom Foyer

8:00 — 8:45 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: Ballroom Foyer

8:45 — 9:00 AM

Welcome Remarks

Location: Ballroom

Introduction

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

9:00 — 9:45 AM

Keynote Address

Location: Ballroom

A dozen years after Prince Rupert received its first container service call, the port in northern British Columbia has become North America’s 18th largest container gateway, according to JOC rankings. And, while getting on the map for Canadian and US importers was a feat itself, the port’s next phase in becoming an even larger gateway for inbound and increasingly outbound trade has only begun. Through the leadership of Shaun Stevenson, president and CEO of the Prince Rupert Port Authority, the port must balance bold expansion with delivering to its customers the consistent service that spurred them to route goods through the once-sleepy resource community. The greater potential lies in how Stevenson and the port’s stakeholders can extend Prince Rupert’s strategy beyond the terminal to the broader supply chain system stretching from adjacent transloading facilities to final destination points. Stevenson’s message of creating a winning formula of collaboration, vision, and innovation that injects value into supply chains resonates far beyond British Columbia. The so-called Prince Rupert model demonstrates that Canada’s container shipping industry can collaborate, hold partners accountable, and build something new, bold, and far more than the sum of its parts.

Keynote Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Featured Speaker

Shaun Stevenson

President and CEO,
Prince Rupert Port Authority

9:45 — 10:20 AM

Canada Trade Outlook:
It All Comes Back to Exports

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Featured Speaker

Peter Hall

Chief Economist
and Vice President,
Export Development Canada

Recent years have increased economic uncertainty on multiple fronts. An alarming rise in populism is increasing the appeal of leaders who aren’t afraid to challenge orthodox approaches and disrupt postwar institutions. Trade flows are at the mercy of ad hoc tariff, border tax, and other interruptions. Investors are rattled, and unwilling to part with their cash. Prominent analysts say the models are now broken. With the mud being this stirred up, is it possible to see the future path of the economy? Against this backdrop, Peter Hall, chief economist and vice president of the Export Development Council, will share his outlook for Canadian exports and imports and the national and global economies. 

10:20 — 10:50 AM

Networking Break

Location: Ballroom Foyer

10:50 — 11:30 AM

Canadian Freight Network:
How’s it Flowing?

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Featured Speaker

Christian Dea

Chief Economist,
Transport Canada

From his rare vantage point, Christian Dea sees how trade is flowing through Canada’s containerized freight network from point of origin to destination, how those flows are changing, and where disruption threatens to flare up. Since 2008, Transport Canada and the country’s top five ports have been sharing data on key metrics, from truck turn times to ocean transit times, to create a barometer of Canadian container flow. The Canadian government is looking to make use of port performance metrics as part of its productivity and bottleneck assessment of its freight transportation system. Beyond that, the fluidity and port indicators give marine terminals and ports a way to measure their performance against their peers and competitors. Dea will share the major findings from such research and outline how Canada's container network can be further calibrated for greater competitiveness.

11:30 AM — 12:00 PM

Canadian Container Shipping Outlook:
Global Forces, Domestic Pressures

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Featured Speaker

Wolfgang Schoch

Managing Director,
Canada,
Hapag-Lloyd

Before the coronavirus reared its head, the container shipping industry had plenty to be confident about, ranging from the vessel orderbook coming more in line with demand to strengthening trans-Pacfic contracts rates. Now, the outlook for global demand is more uncertain than at any time in recent memory, adding to carrier pressures that include fully recouping the higher costs tied to the new global low-sulfur rule, rising protectionism in the form of tariffs, and already-slowing global economic growth. Putting all the myriad forces, both headwinds and tailwinds, into perspective in a presentation informed by deep experience and data, Wolfgang Schloch, managing director of Hapag-Lloyd’s Canada division, will share his outlook for the global and Canadian container shipping industry. Following his opening remarks, Wolfgang and JOC Executive Editor Mark Szakonyi will drill down on what the global trends mean for Canadian supply chains in a fireside-style chat.

12:00 — 1:15 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Ontario and Niagra

1:15  — 2:00 PM

Importers Speak Out

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Magali Amiel

Ph.D,
MCILT,
Transport Leader,
Decathlon Canada

Panelist

Michael Grier

Senior Vice President, Operations,
Dorel Home

From blank sailings to rail blockades, Canadian importers have had plenty of disruption to manage this year. And the impact of the coronavirus on importers’ ability to source from Asia and secure ocean shipping space is unmeasurable as of March. Yet, supply chain managers unable to look at the larger picture and create a longer-term strategy risk losing a competitive edge. Canadian importers — big, small and midsize — will discuss how they’re meeting supply chains challenges, holding transportation providers accountable and making technology work for them.

2:00  — 2:45 PM

Exporters Sound Off

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and
The Journal of Commerce, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Rav Kapoor

CEO and Founder,
ETG Commodities

Panelist

Lonny Kubas

Assistant Vice President,
Supply Chain,
CN

Panelist

Charles Raymond

President and CEO,
Raymont Logistics

The growth of Canadian containerized exports is slowing, as economic growth ebbs and relations with China, a major buyer of bulk and boxed agriculture exports, grow tense. The cutting of ocean capacity, due to a coronavirus-fueled slump in Asia volumes, is testing exports further. Containerized export volume rose just 1.3 percent year over year in 2019, compared to a more than 4 percent expansion clip in each of the prior three years, according to data from the top four Canadian ports. The prospects for 2020 don’t look any rosier, forcing exporters to tap new markets more aggressively and often find new ways of shipping with the help of the transportation service providers. This panel discussion will focus on the challenges Canadian container exporters face and, equally important, how and where they’re finding relief. 

2:45  — 3:15 PM

Networking Break

Location: Ballroom Foyer

3:15  — 3:45 PM

LogTech 2.0:
The JOC View of Innovation

Location: Ballroom

Featured Speaker

Eric Johnson

Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Technology has become indelibly intertwined with the movement of containerized goods, but most shippers, logistics service providers, and carriers are still struggling to understand just what concepts like “digital transformation” and “industry disruption” mean to them in practical terms. Most stakeholders in containerized supply chains also struggle under the weight of budget constraints and disconnected investment capacity, meaning the “do more with less” philosophy is particularly applicable. In this session, JOC Senior Technology Editor will explain the categories of technology that are gaining traction in the container shipping industry, the value of partnerships among software providers and between technology companies and logistics providers, and why logistics professionals should focus on the output, not the inner machinery of technology.

3:45  — 4:30 PM

Demanding Visibility:
Are Shippers Getting a Better View?

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Eric Johnson

Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Panelist

Fabrizio Brasca

Group Vice President,
Global Solutions & Presales,
JDA Software

Panelist

Patrick Lo

President and CEO,
Canaan Group

Panelist

Audrey Ross

Logistics and Customs Specialist, Orchard Custom Beauty

The need to justify basic cargo visibility has long since vanished into the night, replaced by a need for actionable and quality visibility data. Instead of informing a shipper where cargo is, shippers now need to be able to translate predictive information about delays, cargo holds, and transshipments into downstream decisions. Those decisions impact how a shipper satisfies its customers, whether the goods are delivered directly to the consumer, or in business-to-business scenarios that result in empty store shelves or hampered production facilities. If the order of the day is good visibility data, three critical questions remain: 

  • How truly multimodal is the data?
     

  • Through what system does the shipper want the data to be provided?
     

  • Will visibility be paid for as a separate line item, or as part of a larger bundle of services?


None of these can be generalized across a diverse universe of shippers. This session will dissect these critical questions through the lens of Canada’s import and export containerized supply chains via a mix of software provider, 3PL, and BCO perspectives.

4:30  — 5:15 PM

Change Management:
Resetting Expectations in the Age of Disruption

Location: Ballroom

Session Chair

Sarah Barnes-Humphrey

Host of Let’s Talk Supply Chain and CEO of Shipz

Panelist

Lori Benson

Inclusive & Sustainable Procurement Lead,
EY Canada

Panelist

Peter Hawkins

Co-Owner,
and Managing Director, MELLOHAWK Logistics

Panelist

Sapna Malhotra

CEO,
Digiruptor

Panelist

Holly Qualman

Vice President,
Marketing and Client Services, Americas,
Apex Logistics International

Creating a collaborative work environment that’s able to attract new talent and energize older workers takes more than checking off diversity boxes. It requires an openness to listen to diverse viewpoints and engage in different types of conversation. In a discussion led by Sarah Barnes-Humphrey, founder and host of the "Let's Talk Supply Chain'' podcast, speakers will share best practices in listening to and engaging with employees and colleagues, and how to move beyond just conversations to action. Hear from those driving diversity and collaboration among their teams and come away with new ideas to make your teams more dynamic and attractive to collaborative talent.

5:15 — 6:45 PM

Networking Reception

Location: Ballroom Foyer

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.